I Tried a Mustard Bath

Yes, it's a real thing. No, I'm not crazy.

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Did you know athletes swear by mustard baths for soothing muscles? When I heard, I was both intrigued and, to be honest, a little put off. Mustard is hardly my condiment of choice. But after more research, I learned that 1) It's not the kind you doodle on top of a hotdog and 2) It's actually a centuries-old ritual that was employed in Ancient Greece and Rome and has since been popularized by the English.

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In addition to alleviating stress on the body by increasing circulation and drawing out toxins, the Ayurvedic method is said to rejuvenate the skin—a welcome bonus for my dry, ultra-sensitive complexion. Obviously I had to give it a try. And as far as choosing a brand, Dr. Singha's Mustard Bath ($10.99) is considered the Heinz Mustard of mustard baths—so I was off and running.

Detoxing before zzZzz's with an English mustard bath 🏄 @marieclairemag

A photo posted by Lauren Valenti (@lauren_valenti) on

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One night after work, I added a large tablespoon of the light yellow powder to a hot-but-not-too-hot bath and, after throwing on my favorite bossa nova oldies playlist, I hopped into my weird little at-home spa.

It felt nice all over, except for a small cut I had on my foot, which kind of stung. This stuff is potent. It was kind of like bathing in a pool of incense.

After that, per instruction, I took a quick, cold shower, then massaged my body with a scratchy terry cloth towel. After moisturizing, I threw on my silk pajamas (they're better for your skin) and a few extra layers as I had read that if you do it before jumping into bed, you'll sweat through the night and heighten the detoxing effects.

I woke up with super-soft, glowy skin that—swear to god—had an ever-so-slightly spicy scent that lasted the whole next day. Anybody hungry?

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