5 New Job Mistakes

'Tis the season for hiring. Over 1 million college co-eds will graduate this spring, many of whom are already deep in the throes of their job searches. Once all the interviews are completed and offer letters signed, thousands of young, fresh hires will parade into offices across the country for their first week on the job.

If they aren't nervous, they ought to be. An estimated 22% of turnover occurs in the first 45 days of employment, according to the Wynhurst Group, an HR consulting firm based in Arlington, Va. That suggests that employers aren't timid about correcting what they may perceive as a mismatch in the office.

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Another goof common to newbies: the eager beaver syndrome. Take on too much work too early and you may find yourself capsizing. Be realistic about your pace and the workload, advises Seligson.

Here are her five biggest mistakes freshmen employees make when starting a new job.

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