Websurfing at Work Is Good for You

A new study suggests there's no harm — and plenty of benefit — in hitting up Facebook or Twitter on the job.

Minimizing windows to hide your Facebook-friending from the boss? Don't bother. A recent University of Melbourne study suggests a quick Tweet between meetings is good for you and your company, finding that people who browsed the Web at work in moderation (less than 15 percent of the workday) were 9 percent more productive than their fully focused coworkers. Study author Brent Coker, Ph.D., attributes this to the concentration restoration that occurs during web-surfing micro-breaks, plus the autonomy of knowing your employer trusts you to manage yourself. The more enjoyable the distraction (think YouTube vs. paying bills), the more recharged and productive you'll be. Check out Coker's tips for making Web use at work even more productive:

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

· Get a LinkedIn account. Think of it as your digital résumé—post a photo and use the forums to connect with coworkers and their contacts.

· Make Google Alerts do your job. Flag keywords (your name, competitors, and products); related headlines will automatically hit your inbox.

· Visit reputationhawk.com's "Online Reputation Management Survival Kit" before applying for a new job to salvage any questionable search results for free.

Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani
Career
Share
Reshma Saujani Wants to Fix the Tech "Bravery Deficit" in Girls
Career
Share
The GE Executive Pulling Women Up the Ladder with Her
Created for GE
Career
Share
Are You a Female Doctor? You're Probably Getting Paid Less Than Your Male Coworkers
Career
Share
Gretchen Carlson's Lawyer Opens Up About Her Case, Sexual Harassment at Fox News, and Taking on the Most Powerful Man in Media
Career
Share
You're Better at Negotiating Than You Think You Are
Career
Share
The Surprising Connections Between Swimming with Sharks and Talking to Famous People
Career
Share
That Time I Stopped Explaining Myself—and Then Got Everything I Wanted
Career
Share
How I Started a Mega-Successful Company at 26—Without a Business Plan
Career
Share
The Power of Sorry: The New CEO of Lands' End Explains the Lessons She's Learned While Rising to the Top
Career
Share
What 5 Young Women with 5 Very Different Salaries Can Afford