5 Easy Ways to Get a Raise at Work

Mo' money, mo' money, mo' money.

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1. Schedule regular meetings with your boss.

Understand that your boss is busy, but inviting her to coffee once a month to do a quick check in or just getting to know her a bit better helps to strengthen your relationship. Those who have worked for me know I am a firm believer in the importance of career paths and will take time to discuss tangible goals, ways to improve, and advice on how to navigate work politics.

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2. Summarize your work week.

This is not a two-page email. It's a quick recap (bulleted format) of what you worked on, outstanding items, things you need clarification on, and successes. Be ready for two things: Your boss may not respond or she may with some critique. Don't take the lack of or unfavorable feedback personally--your boss is busy and criticism is important to your career growth. It's also a great way to look back at your year if your company does annual reviews.

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3. Meet others in your company for coffee. Why is this important? Just because you have a job doesn't mean that your networking ends. Ask a different person each week to a 15-20 minute coffee break. This will allow you the opportunity to ask how they succeed in their roles and put your name out there. I always find it best to network two levels above your current role to see how they advanced, how long it took, and how they overcame any obstacles along the way.

4. Stay positive.

The person who is constantly complaining and finding it difficult to work with others isn't someone who is likely to succeed. One former employee of mine constantly lamented on tasks she was assigned, complained about coworkers, and didn't care much for corporate processes. It's hard to want to push that person towards success when they seem to not care.

5. Ask for what you want.

While it may seem obvious to you, your manager may not know you're interested in moving up or making more money. The way to approach asking for these things is to put a plan in place: Start doing all of the things listed above and let your manager know you're interested in taking on additional responsibility. After 3 months you have a proven track record. Then, sit down and ask for that raise or leg up. You may not get it right away, but your boss will know that it's something you're interested in. Be sure to follow up in 3-6 months.

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Even More Work Advice:

The High Performer's Cheat Sheet

So...I Cried at Work

5 Tips for Surviving a Terrible Manager

Should You Go Into Business With a Friend?

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