The Kite Makers of Kabul

In The Kite Runner, the film adaptation of Khaled Hosseini's best-selling path-to-manhood tale, it's the creations of renowned local kite maker Noor Agha that fill the sky. Banned during Taliban rule, kite flying — and the more combative kite dueling — is once again Afghanistan's national passion, so Agha's business was already booming. But when DreamWorks came calling, he had to recruit the women in his family to learn this traditionally male craft.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

They all work together in one room. That includes both his wives: Marzia, who makes the bold graphics of each kite into completely unique patchwork patterns, and Farida, who completes the tails and imprints Agha's name and signature scorpion image.

The two wives, working and raising their combined 11 children, are the collaboration that holds the whole kite-making operation together — maybe even more than the family's trademark secret glue.

Read Next:
Donald Trump Time magazine cover
Culture
Share
Time Magazine Named Trump Person of the Year, and Twitter Can't Handle It
Culture
Share
The New 'Fifty Shades Darker' Trailer Is Here and...Wow. Just...Wow.
'Fifty Shades' Is Getting the Virtual Reality Treatment
'Fifty Shades Darker' Will Be R-Rated, with "Graphic Nudity"
Culture
Share
Here's How Celebs Are Reacting to the Grammy Nominations
Woman with gray nails holding smartphone
Culture
Share
Instagram's New Update Lets You Like Comments and Fight Trolls at the Same Time
Culture
Share
Did 'Westworld's (Violent) Ends Justify Its (Violent) Delights?
Culture
Share
There's a Disturbing Hidden Message in This Viral Ad About Teenage Love
Culture
Share
30 New Year's Eve Songs that Will Bring the Party at Your Midnight Bash
Culture
Share
Lauren Graham Addresses That 'Gilmore Girls' Coffee Cup Conspiracy
Culture
Share
Here's an Exclusive Look at Netflix's Highly Anticipated New Film About Obama's College Years
Culture
Share
Amy Sherman-Palladino Says Rory Gilmore *Might* Have an Abortion