Vanderbilt Fraternity Suspended for Rape Joke

Rape is no joke. The Alpha Tau Omega chapter at Vanderbilt University has learned that lesson hard way.

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Vanderbilt University's chapter of Alpha Tau Omega was suspended earlier this month after a member sent an email making light of a major rape case, the Daily Mail reported on Thursday. The email, sent by a now-expelled member, invited current recruits to a football viewing event at the fraternity house, promising that the party would be "a rape-free event...Football is safe again."

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The email references an ongoing case against four former Vanderbilt football players, Brandon Vandenburg, Cory Batey, Brandon Banks, and Jaborian McKenzie, who are accused of raping a student in her dorm room last June.

Vanderbilt released a statement after suspending the frat saying the email "conveys a message that is reprehensible in its disrespect for women and is not representative of the Vanderbilt University student body or the values that we uphold as a community." The national chapter of the fraternity has also suspended the frat and is conducting an investigation, deeming the email "abhorrent."

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