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Tracking Trump's First 100 Days in Office

The president has wasted no time making his mark on the White House—and the world. Here, a real-time record of his actions and what they mean.

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Spicer says Trump will lift transgender bathroom protections

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said today that Donald Trump will rescind federal guidelines allowing transgender students to use bathrooms that match their gender identity. This would be a major reversal of an Obama administration policy that trans advocates say is necessary to protect transgender students. In a press conference, Spicer said "The president has made it clear throughout the campaign that he is a firm believer in states' rights and that certain issues like this are not best dealt with at the federal level."

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos reportedly resisted the idea at first, until Trump sided with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and asked her to drop her objection. In addition to its impact on schools throughout the country, the new guidance could affect future Supreme Court cases, particularly one scheduled to be heard next month that involves a transgender student from Virginia who was denied bathroom access.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump administration drastically expands deportation rules

The White House released expanded immigration guidelines today that will dramatically increase the number of people targeted for deportation. Under former President Obama, immigration officials focused their efforts of undocumented immigrants who had been convicted of violent crimes. The new directives target people who have been convicted of any crime, including those who "have abused any program related to receipt of public benefits," reported The New York Times.

Bizarrely, administration officials reportedly confirmed that the U.S. plans to deport anyone who enters the country illegally from Mexico back there, even if they are not actually from Mexico. The new guidelines will not affect people under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, but the new policy is likely to result in a major increase in deportations.

Key tweet of the day:

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One month down

Monday marked the end of the chaotic first month of Donald Trump's presidency. In his first month in office, Trump has signed 23 executive orders, the most notable being his Muslim travel ban, which is currently mired in court proceedings. He faced his first staff shakeup just 24 days in when his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, resigned over controversial dealings with Russia. So far, he has spent one-quarter of his presidency in Florida, where he raised eyebrows for receiving a classified security briefing at a public dinner table at his Mar-a-Lago resort, and his campaign is under investigation by intelligence agencies for alleged collusion with Russia to hack the Democratic National Committee and influence the outcome of last year's election.

Key tweet of the day:

#LastNightInSweden

The Swedish embassy in Washington, D.C. is asking the State Department for an explanation over comments Donald Trump made yesterday suggesting there was a terror attack in Sweden. During his rally in Florida, Trump discussed national security and said, "You look at what's happening in Germany. You look at what's happening last night in Sweden."

The only problem is that nothing happened Thursday night in Sweden. After the rally, the hashtag "#LastNightInSweden" went viral, and former Swedish foreign minister Carl Bildt tweeted: "Sweden? Terror attack? What has he been smoking? Questions abound."

The White House has not yet clarified Trump's remarks.

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Trump begins campaigning for 2020, because that's a good use of his time

Although Donald Trump has been in office for less than a month, he's already kicked off his re-election campaign. Despite a difficult week in the White House, Trump held a campaign-style rally in Florida on Saturday, where he doubled down on his feud with the media-at-large and reiterated his campaign promises. The rally drew roughly 9,000 to see Trump speak but garnered criticism for taking precious time away from his duties when the White House is in flux. Trump has not yet nominated a replacement for former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

The event was hosted by his campaign group rather than the White House, which is highly unusual this early in a presidency. Trump filed paperwork for his re-election bid shortly after taking office. In contrast, it took former President Obama more than two years to file for his own re-election campaign.

Key tweet of the day:

Key tweet(s) of the day:

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Trump tried to appoint Bob Harward, but he said no, no, no

Retired Vice Admiral Robert Harward turned down an offer Thursday from the Trump administration to become the new national security adviser. Harward was considered a top pick for Michael Flynn's vacated post, and had previously served as Defense Secretary Mattis' deputy when Mattis was in charge of U.S. Central Command. The White House said Friday that Harward turned down the offer because of the time commitment, but several news outlets are reporting that Harward was concerned about not being allowed to form his own team. The national security adviser role is often a highly sought-after position, so Harward's rejection is notable.

Today's news conference was... interesting

Donald Trump held a news conference this afternoon where he attacked the media (again), falsely claimed that he won the election in a landslide (again), asked a veteran black reporter if she was friends with the Congressional Black Caucus and criticized intelligence agencies for their "absolutely real [leaks]" of fake news.

He also made bizarre comments about uranium, asking reporters: "You know what uranium is, right? It's a thing called nuclear weapons and other things. Like lots of things are done with uranium, including some bad things."

Trump's conference was impromptu and puzzling, perhaps a harbinger of new media practices from the White House.

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Trump set to announce new labor secretary pick

Less than 24 hours after Donald Trump's labor secretary pick Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination, Trump is set to name a new one. He is expected to nominate Alexander Acosta, dean of Florida International University Law School. Acosta served as assistant attorney general at the Department of Justice under President George W. Bush, where he worked in the civil rights division. If confirmed, Acosta would be the first Hispanic member of Trump's Cabinet.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump picks the option "both parties like" to solve Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Donald Trump threw away decades of diplomatic policy on Wednesday when he met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. In a joint conference, Trump said he was "looking at two-state and one-state" options to solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict before adding "I like the one that both parties like. I'm very happy with the one that both parties like."

Of course, there is not really an option that "both parties like," which is part of the reason the conflict has lasted more than 50 years. The Palestinians are unlikely to accept any deal that doesn't give them a sovereign state, and Netanyahu is facing pressure from far-right members of his government to annex parts of the West Bank. Trump, for his part, did tell Netanyahu during the conference that he wants Israel to stop expanding settlements while they work on a deal and emphasized that both sides will need to compromise. But this message is somewhat undercut by Trump's refusal to commit to a two-state solution.

Intelligence agencies reportedly withholding intel from Trump

The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that U.S. intelligence officials have withheld information from Donald Trump because "they are concerned it could be leaked or compromised." The report cites anonymous current and former officials and underscores that none of the sources know of an instance where information about security threats was withheld. This is not unheard of; intelligence agencies have withheld information from past presidents when they deemed it necessary to protect sources. What makes this instance different is the officials citing the president's discretion as their reason for withholding.

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Andrew Puzder withdraws his labor secretary nomination

Donald Trump's secretary of labor nominee Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination today, just one day before he was scheduled to appear before the Senate. Puzder, a fast-food executive, had been facing growing pushback from Senate Democrats and Republicans alike after several scandals. Among them: that his family once employed an undocumented immigrant and past abuse allegations that rocketed into the public sphere after Politico obtained tape from an episode of Oprah where his ex-wife accused Puzder of leaving "permanent" damage from physical abuse.

Puzder's withdrawal is the latest blow to the Trump administration, after a chaotic week that saw the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn less than one month into his tenure.

It wasn't just Michael Flynn

Several of Donald Trump's allies, including former campaign manager Paul Manafort, were speaking with Russian officials during the election season, the New York Times reports. The "repeated contacts" between Trump allies and Russia were leaked by four current and former American officials, who intercepted the communications last year. Intelligence agencies have not yet found anything to suggest that the Trump campaign was colluding with Russia to interfere with the election, but the agencies were reportedly worried because of the amount of contact that came while Trump was speaking highly of Russian President Vladimir Putin on the campaign trail.

Manafort strongly rejected these claims. "I have no idea what this is referring to" he said in a statement. "I have never knowingly spoken to Russian intelligence officers, and I have never been involved with anything to do with the Russian government or the Putin administration or any other issues under investigation today." He then added, "It's not like these people wear badges that say, 'I'm a Russian intelligence officer.'"

Key tweet of the day:

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PSA: Do not shine cell phones at classified documents

Donald Trump is facing criticism from Democrats and security analysts after reports broke that he read sensitive documents in public at his Mar-a-Lago resort over the weekend. A member of the resort, Richard Agazio (who has since deleted his Facebook), posted photos online of Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reviewing the documents at a dinner table while staff shined cell phones lights on them. As many have pointed out, aiming an internet-connected cell phone at classified documents is extremely inappropriate, as these devices' cameras and audio can be hacked. Furthermore, it's troublesome that Trump chose to receive classified information in a room full of his resort guests, most of whom likely do not have security clearances.

Key tweet of the day:

*Mike drop*

UPDATE (11:21 PM EST): National security adviser Michael Flynn abruptly resigned from office Monday night after the Justice Department told the White House it believed he could be subject to blackmail by Russian entities. Flynn was in office for less than a month when reports began to circulate that he had deliberately misled Vice President Mike Pence about a conversation he had with the Russian ambassador prior to Trump's inauguration. Keith Kellogg will reportedly serve as the interim national security adviser until President Trump selects a new nominee.

Trump loves Flynn, loves him not

No one really knows where President Trump stands on his national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Late last week, reports surfaced suggesting Flynn misled Vice President Mike Pence about a conversation he had with Russia's ambassador about lifting sanctions. Since then, Trump's response—and the responses from his administration—have been mixed. Trump first suggested Friday that he was unaware of the controversy. Since then, several prominent members of his Cabinet have hedged, refusing to give a direct answer on whether Trump is considering replacing Flynn. Such an early staff shakeup would be very unusual, particularly because Trump has left the National Security Council with an unprecedented amount of vacant positions.

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Key tweet of the day:

Key tweet of the day:

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Hundreds arrested in immigration raids around the U.S.

Hundreds of undocumented immigrants were arrested this week in raids across the country, marking the first major move toward enforcing President Trump's campaign promise to deport the 11 million people living in the U.S. without visas. The raids, which Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) called "routine," targeted people living in New York, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Chicago and the Carolinas.

Similar raids during the Obama administration targeted undocumented immigrants with criminal records. The new raids are different, because ICE officials also rounded up immigrants with no convictions. In January, Trump broadened the criteria the Department of Homeland Security can use to target undocumented immigrants, allowing them to include people with minor or no criminal records.

Key tweets of the day:

Key tweet of the day:

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Ninth Circuit says no to Trump's travel ban

The 9th Circuit Court is not here for Donald Trump's travel ban. In a unanimous decision released Thursday evening, the appeals court ruled againstthe government, meaning Trump's ban will remain suspended. The court's decision said that the government "had not shown a likelihood of success on its merits," or, in other words, the appeals court doesn't believe the law will be upheld in court. Although this is a setback for Trump's travel ban, it is not expected to be the end of the legal battle over the executive order. The government is expected to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Key tweet(s) of the day:

The president has strong opinions about Nordstrom

Donald Trump lashed out Wednesday at department store Nordstrom for dropping his daughter Ivanka's fashion label, tweeting "My daughter Ivanka has been treated so unfairly by @Nordstrom. She is a great person—always pushing me to do the right thing! Terrible!" (The official POTUS account then retweeted it.) His attack on the company raised eyebrows over the ethics of the president using his platform to criticize a company over a deal with his daughter.

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Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey even replied to the tweet by tagging the Office of Government Ethics.

Key (other) tweet of the day:

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Trump's legal battle with Washington State continues

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments Tuesday night over Donald Trump's immigration ban. The government is appealing a decision handed down by U.S. District Court Judge James Robart, who ruled last Friday that the ban was temporarily suspended nationwide. The three-judge appeals court panel is expected to rule in the next few days on whether the ban should be "immediately" reinstated or if the lower court's suspension should remain in place. If they choose not to reinstate the ban, then it's possible that the case would move forward with Robart. However, it's more likely that the government will appeal to the Supreme Court.

Trump gives out fake news to the National Sheriffs Association

Donald Trump was criticized by media Tuesday for once again citing inaccurate murder rate statistics—this time, during a speech at the National Sheriffs Association. During his speech, Trump said "the murder rate in our country is the highest it's been in 47 years." This is patently wrong; the murder rate in the U.S. is actually at its lowest, according to FBI crime data. Trump has been repeatedly critiqued in the past for claiming the murder rate is up but appears to be sticking with his claim.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump escalates his feud with the media

President Trump continued his attacks on the media Monday, accusing the New York Times of "making up stories [and] sources" and later accusing the press of intentionally covering up terrorist attacks in Europe. Though Trump has called the Times a "failing" newspaper regularly since he began campaigning in 2015, today's unsubstantiated accusations are an escalation of his feud with the outlet.

In the afternoon, Trump gave a speech at United States Central Command, where he suggested the media is refusing to report on terrorism in Europe. He did not specify what attacks he is referring to and offered no evidence to support this claim, but said "In many cases the very, very dishonest press doesn't want to report it." It's troubling that Trump continues to attack the legitimacy of any news company that publishes negative coverage about him; earlier in the day, he called "any" negative polls about his immigration ban illegitimate.

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Russia wants an apology over Putin being called a "killer"

Russia is asking for an apology over comments Fox News host Bill O'Reilly made in an interview with Donald Trump that aired Sunday. In the interview, O'Reilly called Russian President Vladimir Putin "a killer," and Trump did not disagree. He instead responded that "There are a lot of killers. We've got a lot of killers. What do you think? Our country's so innocent?" Republicans and Democrats alike have criticized Trump for his refusal to condemn Putin and his authoritarian style of governing.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump says Obamacare replacement could take a year

Donald Trump said in an interview aired Sunday that a replacement for Obamacare could take "till sometime into next year," a notable walk-back from his earlier promises to have the Affordable Care Act repealed quickly. As recently as January 11th, Trump was suggesting that former President Obama's landmark healthcare act would be overturned as soon as his pick for secretary of health and human services was confirmed. The walk-back suggests that the protests from Americans nationwide—as well as some members of Congress—who argue that repealing Obamacare without a replacement plan would be disastrous are having an effect.

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Appeals court delivers a blow to Trump's immigration ban

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals refused early Sunday morning to immediately reinstate Donald Trump's immigration and travel ban, delivering a blow to the administration. Instead, the appeals court asked both sides—the Department of Justice and the State of Washington—to file legal briefs by Monday afternoon before the court makes its final decision. What this means is that the ban will remain suspended until at least Monday, and anyone affected by it can continue to enter the country. But regardless of how the appellate court rules, it is likely this case will quickly make its way to the Supreme Court.

Key tweet of the day:

Federal judge puts a stop to Trump's immigration ban

The Department of Homeland Security announced this morning that they are suspending "any and all actions implementing...the Executive Order" after a Republican-appointed federal judge suspended the ban nationwide. The State Department also announced this morning that they have begun re-issuing visas to travelers from the seven countries affected by Trump's ban, and have notified Customs & Border Protection that approved refugees, travelers with valid visas, and green card holders are to be admitted. Trump's press secretary Sean Spicer has already announced that the Department of Justice will appeal the court's order.

Trump took to Twitter to respond to the ruling:

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Trump rolls back financial regulations because his friends "can't borrow money"

President Trump signed an executive order Friday that scales back large portions of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial regulations, which were designed after the recession to prevent banks from speculating with consumers' money. Trump—and the financial industry—have been critical of Dodd-Frank for a long time, with Trump promising on the campaign trail to overturn it.

At a meeting with business leaders Friday, Trump said, "We expect to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine that had nice businesses, they can't borrow money." Though people commonly disagree over how much the financial industry should be regulated, it is noteworthy that the president has openly stated that he's making policy to help his friends.

States plan to sue the president over the immigration ban

Hawaii has reportedly joined the growing number of states suing Donald Trump over his immigration ban. The state's attorney general, Doug Chin, announced at a press conference that they would file paperwork in court today to challenge the ban. Several other states—Washington, New York, Virginia and Massachusetts—have already filed a suit, arguing that the ban is unconstitutional. Current legal challenges against the ban surround everything from due process to the establishment clause, which prohibits laws that favor specific religions. If these challenges are successful in district court, it is likely they will be appealed and potentially make their way up to the Supreme Court.

House Republicans repeal a ban on mentally ill people buying guns

The House GOP has overturned an Obama-era gun control regulation that would have helped prevent people with documented mental illnesses from buying guns. The policy meant that people who can't manage their finances because of a mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder would be reported to the FBI so their names would appear during background checks. The National Rifle Association, as well as some disability advocacy groups, opposed the measure for being discriminatory—and now it's off the table.

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Kellyanne Conway makes up a massacre on MSNBC

White House senior adviser Kellyanne Conway defended Trump's immigration in a TV interview Thursday by saying that people didn't know "that President Obama had a six-month ban on the Iraqi refugee program after two Iraqis came here to this country, were radicalized and they were the masterminds behind the Bowling Green massacre. It didn't get covered." That's true; it didn't get covered—because it didn't happen.

First of all, former President Obama never banned Iraqi refugees. Instead, he ordered a re-vetting of more than 57,000 Iraqi refugees, which caused a temporary delay in admitting new ones.

Second, there was no massacre at Bowling Green. Conway later clarified that she meant "Bowling Green terrorists," but the two men she's referring to—Waad Ramadan Alwan and Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, who settled in Bowling Green, Kentucky—never carried out (or even planned) an attack on U.S. soil. They were arrested for trying to get weapons to Al Qaeda in Iraq.

Key tweet of the day:

Spicer uses attack Iran didn't carry out to justify putting them "on notice"

At a press conference Thursday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer falsely claimed that Iran attacked a U.S. naval ship, which would be an act of war. In reality, the attack was carried out by Houthi rebels on a Saudi Arabian ship, the Intercept reported. Spicer's comments were an attempt to justify the White House putting Iran "on notice" several days before, and he has not yet addressed his false statement that Iran was behind the attack.

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Trump wants to build a bridge between church and state

Donald Trump said at this morning's National Prayer Breakfast that he wants to "destroy" the Johnson Amendment, a federal law that prevents tax-exempt churches from engaging in political activity. Trump had promised evangelical voters that he would overturn the amendment during his campaign, but to do so as president would require approval from Congress. It also would mark a serious move away from the separation of church and state that has been a traditional hallmark of American democracy.

Trump prays for Arnold Schwarzenegger's TV ratings

Trump is now feuding with Arnold Schwarzenegger. At this morning's National Prayer Breakfast, the president referenced leaving The Apprentice and how "the ratings went right down the tubes." He then said he wanted to pray for Arnold Schwarzenegger, "for those ratings." Schwarzenegger, the former governor of California, fired back on Twitter, saying "Hey Donald. I have a great idea. Why don't we switch jobs? You take over TV, cause you're such an expert in ratings. And I take over your job, so that people can finally sleep comfortably again." Trump's comments may have been a joke, but they represent a departure from how former presidents have addressed the breakfast.

Republicans suddenly care about having a full Supreme Court

The New York Times reported yesterday that President Trump is encouraging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to "go nuclear" with the Supreme Court vote if Democrats try to stall his pick. The so-called nuclear option would allow Republicans to approve Trump nominee Neil Gorsuch by simple majority, rather than with the traditional 60 votes. This would be an expansion of an action Democrats took in November 2013, when they used the nuclear option to eliminate filibusters on executive branch nominations and federal judicial appointments other than the Supreme Court. But Democrats are furious that Republicans are asking for a smooth confirmation process after stalling action on Obama nominee Merrick Garland for almost a full year.

Key tweet of the day:

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U.S.-Australia relations go down under

On Wednesday, Donald Trump threatened to break an international deal on Twitter.

The tweet was the latest in a new dispute between Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, after Trump shouted at Turnbull during a scheduled call, told Turnbull it was "the worst call by far" that he'd had with a foreign leader, and then hung up 25 minutes into what was expected to be an hourlong talk. Australia is one of the United States' staunchest allies, so Trump's treatment of Turnbull raised some eyebrows, and some worry this could cause a rift in the countries' relationship.

Republicans push Trump nominees through without Democrats present

The Republican-run Senate Finance Committee approved two of Donald Trump's Cabinet picks—Steve Mnuchin for the treasury and Tom Price for the department of health and human services—by overriding a rule that requires at least one Democrat to be present. (Democrats were boycotting the committee meeting for a second straight day.) The move is an unusual about-face from normal procedures—and will likely increase tensions between the parties.

Trump's Black History Month speech is about everything but black history

Donald Trump gave a speech today in honor of Black History Month, but spent most of it talking about himself, how he did with black voters in the election, and why CNN is "fake news." Although Trump referenced several African-American heroes, most mentions were brief. He also seemed to claim during his speech that he got "substantially more [black votes] than other candidates who had run in the past years." This is false; exit polls showed that Hillary Clinton won around 88 percent of the black vote.

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Key tweet of the day:

Trump nominates Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court

In a primetime livestream, Trump announced Neil Gorsuch as his nominee to fill Antonin Scalia's nearly year-long vacant seat on the Supreme Court. He's very much in the mold of Scalia, a "textualist" conservative who many believe—based in part on his famous decision to allow Hobby Lobby to deny employees contraception coverage for religious reasons—could put women's reproductive rights in jeopardy if confirmed. (Read 10 key takeaways about Gorusch here.)

Now, the confirmation process begins in the Senate, where Gorsuch needs 60 votes—eight of which must come from Democrats—to be confirmed.

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Trump meets with his potential Supreme Court nominees ahead of announcement

The New York Times reports that Trump is meeting with his top two choices for Supreme Court nominee today ahead of his official announcement, which will take place at 8 p.m. The two judges are Neil Gorsuch and Thomas Hardiman.

Trump won't touch LGBT rights

Despite rumors that the Trump administration had drafted a new executive order that would affect federal benefits, adoption rights, and access to services for LGBT citizens, the White House issued a statement this morning saying the president would let Obama's protections stand. "President Trump continues to be respectful and supportive of L.G.B.T.Q. rights, just as he was throughout the election," the statement said.

Trump fires acting Attorney General Sally Yates

Just over two hours after she told the DOJ not to defend Trump's immigration ban, he fired her. In a press release, he claimed that Yates had "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to enact the order. His administration swore in Dana Boente, U.S. attorney for the eastern district of Virginia, as her replacement.

Acting Attorney General Sally Yates tells Department of Justice not to defend the immigration ban

Because she doesn't believe it's lawful, Obama-appointed Attorney General Sally Yates—who will be replaced by Jeff Sessions if and when he's confirmed by the Senate—told the Department of Justice not to make legal arguments defending President Trump's immigration ban.

Trump says the media is "the opposition party"

In a tweet, the president referred to the mainstream media as "the opposition party," an idea introduced by Steve Bannon last week in an interview with the New York Times. Trump's ongoing feud with the media is unusual; though most presidents conflict with media outlets at some point, Trump's statements about what the press' role is, comments about holding reporters "accountable" for treating him "unfairly" (which is to say reporting on his actions), and repeated attacks on the legitimacy of certain legacy news outlets are a notable escalation.

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Trump announces that he'll announce his Supreme Court nominee tomorrow

In a bit of reality-TV flair, President Trump teased that he will announce his Supreme Court pick tomorrow at 8 p.m. (two days earlier than originally planned, which may be an attempt to shift the news narrative away from the immigration ban). Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley also announced today that Democrats will filibuster any pick other than Merrick Garland, who was Obama's nominee to replace the late Antonin Scalia nearly a year ago, and who Republicans have actively resisted confirming so Trump could make the pick instead.

Trump institutes new federal regulation swap

Trump signed an executive order this morning that for every new federal regulation, two must be revoked.

Key tweets of the day:

The White House softens the immigration ban—but only for green card holders and permanent residents

Senior White House official Reince Priebus appeared to reverse the administration's position on green card holders Sunday. In an interview, Priebus said that the immigration and travel ban would not apply to permanent residents "moving forward." But he also added that people traveling to and from the listed countries—potentially including U.S. citizens—could be subject to extra questioning if Customs officials deem them "suspicious."

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Key tweet of the day:

People continue to be detained at airports

Customs and Border Protection is reportedly ignoring the court order and continuing to detain people with valid visas at airports across the country.

An Iranian woman and her 10-month-old baby are released after 11 hours of detention at LAX

A federal judge assists detained refugees and requests further legal review of the ban

A federal judge ruled around 9 p.m. that the government could not return refugees to their country of origin until further legal review of the ban. Several other judges have since ruled along similar lines.

Steve Bannon gets unprecedented power on the National Security Council

The Trump administration downgraded the national director of intelligence and joint chiefs of staff from their permanent positions on the National Security Council and replaced them with White House senior adviser Steve Bannon, the former publisher of alt-right white nationalist news hub Breitbart. Restructuring the National Security Council this way puts the controversial Bannon—whose appointment to Trump's administration did not require Senate confirmation—in a key decision-making position about war and other critical threats to the country.

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Protests erupt amid refugee ban outrage

Thousands of protesters demonstrated across the country in reaction to what Democrats—and Trump advisor Rudy Giuliani—are referring to as the "Muslim ban," the implementation of which has resulted in the detention of refugees and green card and visa holders at airports across the U.S. Because the executive order was drafted without the input of various government agencies, it took officials by surprise, and they're struggling to determine who can enter the country and who, now, cannot.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump signs a monumental executive order preventing citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States

President Trump signed a controversial refugee ban that, under the auspices of preventing radical Islamic terrorists from committing crimes against our citizens, bars all Syrian refugees from entering the country indefinitely, halts the remaining refugee program for 120 days, and blocks any entry by citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria or Yemen for 90 days, regardless of visa status. It's worth noting that the ban excludes countries where Trump has business ties.

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The White House shows unprecedented support for the March For Life demonstration

President Trump tweeted out his support for the anti-abortion March For Life, saying their demonstration is "so important." Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the rally, making him the highest ranked public official to ever speak at the annual March For Life event.

Key tweet of the day:

(Days later, news broke that Gregg Phillips himself is registered to vote in three states.)

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto cancels his meeting with President Trump

President Trump tweeted Thursday that if Mexico is unwilling to pay for his proposed border wall—one of his campaign promises—that they should cancel the planned meeting between the two countries. Following this announcement, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto did cancel the meeting, saying "This morning we have informed the White House that I will not attend the meeting scheduled for next Tuesday with the POTUS."

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Trump does his first White House interview

The president's first interview—with ABC's David Muir—aired tonight. He doubled down on false claims about the size of his inauguration crowd and the amount of voter fraud in the United States. See the interview's five most talked-about moments here.

Trump orders the construction of the wall

He's making good on what is perhaps his most notorious campaign promise: to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico. Today he signed an executive order that directs the government to "take all appropriate steps to immediately plan, design, and construct a physical wall along the southern border, using appropriate materials and technology to most effectively achieve complete operational control…"

What remains to be seen—but is hotly contested—is who will pay for it.

Trump orders an immigrations and customs enforcement hiring increase

The president directed Immigrations and Customs Enforcement to hire 10,000 additional officers.

Trump orders large-scale investigation into voter fraud

Despite all evidence to the contrary, President Trump remains convinced that millions of Americans voted illegally in the 2016 presidential election—and maintains that none of these alleged illegal voters cast ballots for him. After reporters point out that if it were true, it would be a massive blow to democracy (and suggest that he put his money where his mouth is and investigate if he truly believes it), he announced that he will, in fact, order an investigation.

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Trump orders approval of the Dakota Access Pipeline construction project

Trump released a memorandum restarting construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline, which the Obama administration had effectively squashed. The Dakota Access Pipeline has faced significant opposition from environmentalists and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe because the pipeline crosses through the Tribe's sacred land and could impact the quality of their drinking water.

Trump signals that the Keystone XL pipeline will resume construction again

President Trump released a memorandum allowing TransCanada to re-submit its petition to build the Keystone XL pipeline, which has faced serious opposition from environmental activists.

Key tweets of the day:

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Trump signs a federal hiring freeze

Donald Trump signed a presidential memo freezing hiring on all federal government roles, excluding military and national security positions.

Trump reinstates an international abortion gag order

The president has implemented a Reagan-era policy preventing foreign NGOs from receiving U.S. funds if they perform or promote abortions. This policy has flip-flopped with every recent president—Bill Clinton revoked the rule during his time in office, George W. Bush reinstated it, and Barack Obama revoked it again in 2009.

Kellyanne Conway says the White House's crowd size claims are "alternative facts"

Kellyanne Conway appeared on NBC's Meet the Press and told Chuck Todd that President Trump and White House press secretary Sean Spicer's false claims about the size of President Trump's inaugural crowd are "alternative facts." Shortly afterward, #alternativefacts went viral online.

Key tweet of the day:

Trump speaks about his crowd size and the media at the CIA

President Trump visited the CIA and, in front of the Memorial Wall commemorating fallen agents, gave a seemingly unscripted and wide-ranging speech. He said the media is to blame for making it sound like he "had a feud" with the agencies, although Trump personally criticized the intelligence community several times prior to the meeting.

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Women protest Trump with the March on Washington

Far more than the originally estimated 200,000 people flooded the streets of the capitol (and cities around the globe) for the Women's March, a protest of Trump's anti-woman rhetoric and policy plans, causing the inevitable comparisons between today's crowd and yesterday's.

Press secretary Sean Spicer rails against the media in first briefing

At his first press briefing after the inauguration, in his first official capacity as journalists' liaison to the White House, press secretary Sean Spicer lambasted the media for what he claims is unfair reporting about the inauguration crowd size. Watch here.

Trump waives rules that would prevent cabinet members from serving

Among his other day-one moves: a regulatory freeze asking agencies not to submit any new regulations and signing waivers allowing certain members of his Cabinet—such as Secretary of Defense James Mattis—to serve in his administration despite conflicts.

And the Executive Orders begin

Donald Trump's first executive order suspends a planned decrease in mortgage rates for first-time home buyers that was announced in the final weeks of former President Obama's term. While Republicans say the move is an effort to prevent another taxpayer bailout of Wall Street, Democrats argue that it only raises costs for low-income and middle-class home buyers.

The administration also releases an executive order directing federal agencies to "waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation" of any part of the Affordable Care Act that creates an "economic burden" for states.

Inauguration Day gets a special name

Among his first official actions is to declare January 20, 2017, the "National Day of Patriotic Devotion." Other presidents have named their inaugural days; historically, the names are chosen to mark an American value. Former President Obama, for example, named his 2009 inauguration the "National Day of Renewal and Reconciliation."

Trump takes office

Today Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. In his speech, he promises to end "American carnage" and says that his administration will prioritize "America first."

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