Emma Watson Was Just Bullied for Defending Equal Rights

She was told to "stick to telling the rules of Quidditch."

Emma Watson
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Emma Watson has done great work for the United Nations in her role as a Goodwill Ambassador. According to E! Online (opens in new tab), the actress and activist recently visited New York to give a speech about equal rights as part of her ongoing HeForShe campaign.

Watson's captivating speech called for universities to provide true equality for women and minorities and to make it clear that their safety is a "a right and not a privilege." It was a moving and important speech, but not everyone was impressed.

Rod Liddle, a reporter for The Sun, took Watson's speech as a chance to ridicule her and her cause. Louise Ridley tweeted a picture of the offensive blurb.

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There's a lot wrong with Liddle's commentary, beginning with the fact that he addresses Watson as "Hermione Granger" (her fictional character from the Harry Potter series) before acknowledging her by name.

He went on to suggest that Watson should "stick to telling [people] the rules of quidditch or how to turn someone into a frog" and assert that she "bored" the UN assembly with her "whining, leftie, PC crap."

Luckily, Liddle's opinion isn't shared by most people. Watson is an intelligent, outspoken feminist and her HeForShe campaign (opens in new tab) has inspired 1,302,682,254 gender equality actions as of this writing. We're sure she won't let bullies—even those that write for newspapers—slow her down.

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Kayleigh Roberts
Weekend Editor

Kayleigh Roberts is a freelance writer and editor with more than 10 years of professional experience. Her byline has appeared in Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, ELLE, Harper’s Bazaar, The Atlantic, Allure, Entertainment Weekly, MTV, Bustle, Refinery29, Girls’ Life Magazine, Just Jared, and Tiger Beat, among other publications. She's a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.