Frank Underwood Is Dead in 'House of Cards,' This Chilling New Promo Confirms

"When they bury me, it won't be in my backyard," Claire tells his grave.

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(Image credit: David Giesbrecht)

The Netflix hit House of Cards doesn't hold back when it comes to grisly ends—remember when Kate Mara was pushed in front of of an oncoming subway car?—and so, maybe, in its own words, "You should have known." Frank Underwood is dead in House of Cards' sixth season, a new promo for the hit show reveals. Not Jon Snow in Game of Thrones dead, but really dead. There's a shiny tombstone and fresh flowers and everything.

The character of Frank Underwood was written entirely out of the sixth and final season after Kevin Spacey faced sexual assault allegations last winter (which he denies). At the time, rumors swirled that Netflix would just kill off his character—especially when it was confirmed that Claire Underwood, the true hero of the entire series, would become president. (Finally! The ending in politics we all deserve.) Little was known for sure about Frank's fate, however, until the promo dropped Wednesday morning.

The teaser opens with Robin Wright standing in a garden. "I'll tell you this, though, Francis," says a very chill-looking Claire, considering her husband of several decades has perished. "When they bury me, it won't be in my backyard. And when they pay their respects, they'll have to wait in line."

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The camera pans out to two tombstones, one belonging to Frank (or Francis Underwood, as is written on the grave), and the other belonging to his father. Frank, according to the tombstone, lived until 2017, which also happened to be the time that the allegations against Spacey resurfaced, effectively ending his career. Subtle, Netflix.

You can stream House of Cards on Netflix from November 2.

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Jenny Hollander
Jenny Hollander

Jenny is the Director of Content Strategy at Marie Claire. Originally from London, she moved to New York in 2012 to attend the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and never left. Prior to Marie Claire, she spent five years at Bustle building out its news and politics coverage. She loves, in order: her dog, goldfish crackers, and arguing about why umbrellas are fundamentally useless.