Dutch Princess Says She Found “Freedom” In Spain After Threats Forced Her to Move

“A touching demonstration of friendship at a difficult time,” her father, King Willem-Alexander, said.

(Image credit: Getty Images)

While attending King's Day celebrations in Emmen, Netherlands in honor of her father, King Willem-Alexander's birthday, Princess Amalia of the Netherlands told local reporters she is "grateful" for the opportunity to find safety and "freedom" in Madrid, Spain amid ongoing threats.

According to a previous report from the BBC, organized crime communications showed that Princess Amalia was a possible target while she was attending the University of Amsterdam. As fears she would either be kidnapped or attacked grew, the future queen was forced to return home.

She then secretly moved to Madrid, Spain, so that she could continue her studies.

"Of course, it was strange circumstances that made me go there," she told Dutch reporters, as reported by Bild. "I'm still very grateful to everyone who made it possible for me to walk around there in freedom. I managed to find a little more freedom there than was possible here."

Princess Amalia of The Netherlands during King's Day on April 27, 2024 in Emmen, Netherlands.

Princess Amalia of The Netherlands during King's Day on April 27, 2024 in Emmen, Netherlands.

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Princess Amalia went on to say that living in Spain "made life" back home in the Netherlands "somewhat possible again."

"The Netherlands is my home, so it's nice to be here again," she added.

In April, Princess Amalia's father, King Willem-Alexander, revealed that his eldest daughter was living in Spain while hosting the country's King Felipe and Queen Letizia during a state visit. While speaking at the event's state banquet, the King thanked the Spanish royal family and all those who made it possible for his daughter to seek refuge.

"Last year, circumstances required (my daughter) to live in Madrid. From there, she was able to continue her studies at the University of Amsterdam," King Willem-Alexander said, as reported by People at the time. "This was made possible by the kind efforts of many of your compatriots and yourselves. A touching demonstration of friendship at a difficult time. I'd like to express my heartfelt thanks to you and to everyone else who helped arrange this."

Princess Amalia of The Netherlands, Queen Maxima of The Netherlands, King Willem-Alexander of The Netherlands, Princess Alexia of The Netherlands and Princess Ariane of The Netherlands during King's Day on April 27, 2024 in Emmen, Netherlands.

Princess Amalia of The Netherlands, Queen Maxima of The Netherlands, King Willem-Alexander of The Netherlands, Princess Alexia of The Netherlands and Princess Ariane of The Netherlands during King's Day on April 27, 2024 in Emmen, Netherlands.

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Spain was arguably chosen for one of several reasons as a safe haven for the future queen: Princess Amalia is fluent in Spanish, due in part because her mother, Queen Maxima of the Netherlands, is from Argentina. It is also where her parents first met.

"Spain has a special place in our hearts. First of all, because it was in your country that our life together began," the King said during the same state dinner speech. "We were at the Feria de Abril in Seville 25 years ago. The sparks began to fly. The rest is history."

During the King's Day celebrations, King Willem-Alexander said it was "terrible" that Princess Amalia wasn't able to "spread her wings" under normal circumstances, but was grateful that "luckily, it worked out in Madrid."

Queen Maxima went on to say that her daughter is "smart," "independent," and, as a result, was able to "handle it very well."

Danielle Campoamor is an award-winning freelance writer covering mental health, reproductive justice, abortion access, maternal mental health, politics, celebrity, and feminist issues. She has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, NBC, Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Marie Claire, InStyle, Playboy, Teen Vogue, Glamour, The Daily Beast, and more.