THE MAKEUP

AW: The yellow-green eyeshadow shows she's an outgoing person and is comfortable drawing attention to herself. Still, it sort of takes away from her big, pretty eyes.

JESSIE: I'm outgoing, but I can be shy, too. I'm also a designer, and I express myself through clothes, hair, and makeup.

THE SMILE

AW: She's making eye contact and seems friendly. Her smile looks real and inviting.

JESSIE: As a boutique owner, I'm always working with the public, so I smile a lot. I enjoy people.

THE HAIR

AW: While her smile is warm, her contrasting, edgy highlights make her look a little hard.

JESSIE: When I went to art school, everyone had chunky highlights. I used to have silver streaks but changed to blonde because I think it looks more natural.

THE TATTOOS

AW: Flying birds are optimistic. She's showing them off here, but they're on the inside of her upper arms, so she doesn't have to if she doesn't want to.

JESSIE: I chose swallows because they're a symbol of freedom. My tattoos are my secret treasure — sometimes even I forget they're there.

After giving us her first impressions of Jessie, Wechsler answers Jessie's questions.

JESSIE: I've always been really insecure about my skin. My self-confidence can fluctuate — I'm definitely up and down in that area. I get pimples here and there, and there's no use hiding them because the makeup eventually comes off anyway. And I'd rather look natural than like I'm wearing a mask.

AW: Have you tried using a cover-up with an acne treatment like salicylic acid? Look for one that has a 2 percent strength — the maximum you can get without a prescription. If it's oil-free, it won't clog pores and cause more breakouts. Also, try a powder foundation, which will absorb excess oil. And use blotting papers throughout the day to soak up sweat and grease.

JESSIE: I also have tiny bumps on my upper arms. I've tried using Retin-A and even consulted a nutritionist, but they never go away.

AW: This sounds like keratosis polaris, a common condition where the hair follicles get plugged up by thick skin. You need something that will break down the keratin without irritating the skin — maybe an exfoliating urea cream like Carmol 20. Don't scrub the bumps; scrubbing won't help.

JESSIE: I know! I tried scrubbing, and it got worse. I used to cover myself up with long-sleeve turtlenecks because I was so embarrassed. But now I live in North Carolina, and it's too hot to wear long sleeves all the time. Finally, I said, "I'm just going to love you, little bumps."

AW: For some, having a condition like this as a teenager could permanently affect their sense of self.

JESSIE: Funny, I'd finally come to accept it, and now there's a solution!

What Do You Think?