Judge Barbara Walther has asked that the YFZ custody mélange be divided into 119 cases, grouping each case by mother. I, for one, am delighted that some degree of individualism has been accorded these people who have been die-cut by their own patriarchs and then by the state of Texas. By giving individual attention to the children and their parents, problems can be identified and their needs will more likely be met. The practice of lumping people together (originally the 460 children were grouped into one of two camps) erases individuality and erodes the importance of each human life. The process certainly will require more expense than broadly grouping people, but if you've already spent $14 million, you might as well do justice to what you've taken on and finish it up properly. Careful action may set the Texas raid apart from the Short Creek raid of 1953.

Bravo, Texas, for taking a strong step in the right direction!

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