Selena Gomez Talked Being Mocked by the Media After Seeking Mental Health Treatment

Selena Gomez spoke to Vogue Australia about the stigma attached to mental illness and the media bullying she faced when she first sought treatment.

los angeles, california november 24 selena gomez attends the 2019 american music awards at microsoft theater on november 24, 2019 in los angeles, california photo by axellebauer griffinfilmmagic
(Image credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin)
  • Selena Gomez spoke about the stigma attached to mental illness and the media bullying she faced when she first sought treatment in her new Vogue Australia cover interview.
  • "I never understood the stigma until I went to my first treatment centre," Gomez said. "But then there was a photograph that got out, and it’s wild to see how mean they were."
  • "I’m watching all of that change, slowly but surely, because now, if any media outlet made fun of me, they’re the ones that look like the asshole because we don’t tolerate that anymore," she continued.

In her latest Vogue Australia cover interviewSelena Gomez spoke about the stigma attached to mental illness, and the cruel coverage she received from the media when she first sought treatment. Gomez, who shared her bipolar disorder diagnosis in an Instagram Live with Miley Cyrus last year, also discussed the positive impact of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in maintaining her mental health.

"I’ve been to four treatment centres. I think in mental health, I never understood the stigma until I went to my first treatment centre, because that was years ago," she said. "But then there was a photograph that got out, and it’s wild to see how mean they were."

"It was like: 'She’s the next this person, she’s the childhood star,' whatever. And: 'She’s doing drugs.' They’re saying all this stuff about me," Gomez continued. "I’m watching all of that change, slowly but surely, because now, if any media outlet made fun of me, they’re the ones that look like the asshole because we don’t tolerate that anymore."

Gomez, who recently launched the Mental Health 101 campaign with Rare Beauty to improve mental health services in education, told Vogue Australia, "I have goals. I want to put this as a curriculum into schools." She also spoke about the steps she takes to protect her mental wellbeing. "I feel like I practise [DBT] every day," Gomez said. "And then I also love being in the studio. Because the first hour I’m in a studio, I just talk. It’s like therapy. You just go in and you share your heart."