Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Called for an End to Structural Racism in the U.K.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry spoke out about structural racism while launching a campaign to celebrate Black History Month in the U.K.

bognor regis, united kingdom october 03 prince harry, duke of sussex and meghan, duchess of sussex visits university of chichesters engineering and digital technology park during an official visit to sussex on october 3, 2018 in bognor regis, united kingdom the duke and duchess married on may 19th 2018 in windsor and were conferred the duke duchess of sussex by the queen the duke and duchess married on may 19th 2018 in windsor and were conferred the duke duchess of sussex by the queen photo by samir husseinsamir husseinwireimage
(Image credit: Karwai Tang)
  • Meghan Markle and Prince Harry spoke out about structural racism while launching a campaign to celebrate Black History Month in the U.K.
  • "For as long as structural racism exists, there will be generations of young people of colour who do not start their lives with the same equality of opportunity as their white peers," they wrote.
  • The Sussexes have compiled a list of Black British "Next Gen Trailblazers."

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have called for an end to structural racism in the U.K., while launching a new campaign to celebrate Black British leaders and trailblazers. In an article (opens in new tab) in the Evening Standard, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said, "For as long as structural racism exists, there will be generations of young people of colour who do not start their lives with the same equality of opportunity as their white peers. And for as long as that continues, untapped potential will never get to be realised."

To mark the start of Black History Month in the U.K, Meghan and Harry compiled a list of "Next Gen Trailblazers," (opens in new tab) asking high-profile Black British figures including writer and actor Michaela Coel, British Vogue editor Edward Enninful, writer Afua Hirsch, and Olympic boxer Nicola Adams to nominate someone whose "cause-driven work is creating a lasting legacy for the next generation of Brits." The list includes gal-dem (opens in new tab) founder Liv Little, educational campaigner and The Black Curriculum (opens in new tab) founder Lavinya Stennett, disability advocate Danielle Oreoluwa Jinadu, and writer and poet Henry Stone.

A post shared by Evening Standard (@evening.standard) (opens in new tab)

A photo posted by on

"If you are white and British, the world you see often looks just like you—on TV, in media, in the role models celebrated across our nation. That is not a criticism; it’s reality," the Sussexes wrote. "Many recognise this, but others are not aware of the effect this has on our own perspective, our own bias, but also the effect it has on young people of colour."

"For people of colour and specifically for young black Britons, the importance of representation in all parts of society, of seeing role models that share the same colour skin as them, and seeing and reading stories of success and of hope from those who look like them, is absolutely vital in opening doors of opportunity," Meghan and Harry continued. "Not only that, but representation in positions of power and decision-making is necessary—because that’s how equity and opportunity are translated from words to action."

RELATED STORIES
Emily Dixon
Morning Editor

Emily Dixon is a British journalist who’s contributed to CNN, Teen Vogue, Time, Glamour, The Guardian, Wonderland, The Big Roundtable, Bust, and more, on everything from mental health to fashion to political activism to feminist zine collectives. She’s also a committed Beyoncé, Kacey Musgraves, and Tracee Ellis Ross fan, an enthusiastic but terrible ballet dancer, and a proud Geordie lass.