The Supermodels of the 1960's

They don't call the decade the Swinging Sixties for nothing.

jean shrimpton 60s
They don't call the decade the Swinging Sixties for nothing. Amid major social movements, a musical revolution, and changing fashions a new crop of fashion muses emerged, who redefined beauty and carved out the term 'supermodel'.
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Jean Shrimpton

As one of the world's first supermodels, Jean Shrimpton spearheaded the new wave of cover girls spawned from the Swinging London movement. She was discovered by photographer David Bailey (whom she'd go on to have a higly-publicized 4-year relationship with) in 1960 and went on to cover countless fashion magazines and popularize the mini-skirt.

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Veruschka

For German-born Veruschka, it was an infamous scene in the 1966 film Blow Up that catapulted her to international fame. Richard Avedon called her "the most beautiful woman in the world," and she went on to become one of the highest-paid models in the world. Back in 2010, 71-year-old Veruschka walked the runway during the Giles Spring 2011 show at Paris Fashion Week.

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Twiggy

Inarguably the Queen of Mod, Twiggy was crowned "The Face of '66" by the Daily Express at just 16-years-old. Her signature look — a cropped haircut, spider lashes, and boyish frame — was the epitome of modern and landed her on the cover of every major magazine. She retired from modeling in 1970, but continues to be a fashion icon to this day.

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Donyale Luna

Donyale Luna was the world's first African American cover girl. She was known for her exquisqite 5-foot-11 frame, razor-edged bone structure, and almond-shaped eyes. In addition to modeling, she starred in many of Andy Warhol's underground films, as well as Federico Fellini's Fellini Satyricon (1970). She died tragically due to an accidental overdose at the age of 34.

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Penelope Tree

Penelope Tree was first photographed by Diane Arbus at the age of 13. After a much-talked-about appearance in a high-slit dress at Truman Capote's Black and White Ball in 1966, Richard Avedon and Cecil Beaton plotted to make the 17-year-old Tree a supermodel. She became a regular on the Swinging London scene and represented a new kind of beauty. When John Lennon was asked to describe Tree in three words, he called her, "Hot, hot, hot, smart, smart, smart!"

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Peggy Moffitt

Peggy Moffitt had one of the most distinct looks in the business thanks to her razor-sharp, asymmetrical haircut by Vidal Sassoon, Kabuki-inspired makeup, and affinity for extreme fashion. She made international headlines in 1964 when she wore a topless monokini bathing suit created by her dear friend designer Rudi Gerenreich in a photograph that appeared in Women’s Wear Daily.

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Patti Boyd

Pattie Boyd was the muse behind two of rock 'n' roll's greatest songs: "Something" by The Beatles and "Layla" by Eric Clapton. She began her career as a model in 1962, where she was photographed by the likes of David Bailey and Terrence Donovan. She met her future husband George Harrison when she was cast in A Hard Day's Night.

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Linda Keith

Linda Keith was another model who inspired pivotal musicians of the '60s. She served as a muse to The Rolling Stones (she dated Keith Richards), as well as Jimi Hendrix, whose career she helped catapult after wathcing him perform in a New York City club. She is portrayed by Imogen Poots in the upcoming Hendrix biopic Jimi: All Is by My Side.

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Linda Morand

The Jackie O look-a-like was discovered while studying art in New York City by Eileen Ford herself in 1965. She became notorious not just for her resemblance to the former first lady, but for being one of the first American models to model for French haute couture shows.

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